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Wu Zunyou, chief epidemiologist at the Chinese Cente

for Disease Control and Prevention, said the latest study done in Britain shows the possibility of

curing HIV/AIDS through stem-cell transplants and is a ray of hope to those living with HIV.

“However, it is still too early to say the method can by copied and promoted extensively to treat people with HIV,” Wu said.

A big hurdle in such research is the difficulty of finding donors with the CCR5 delta 32 ge

netic mutation, given that the percentage of people with the mutation is very low among the total population, he said.

“Besides, there are different subtypes of HIV, which require different coreceptors to produce an infection,” he said. “Other HIV co

receptors exist besides CCR5, so such a method will not be effective in treating HIV if the virus infects through oth

er coreceptors,” he said. Coreceptors create a docking area on cells for HIV infection.

Wu Hao, a professor of infectious diseases at Beijing Youan Hospital, said the research is important and may have valu

e in the search for a cure for HIV patients. Some Chinese researchers are also conducting similar research, he said.

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